Study by world leader in assisted reproduction confirms COVID vaccine does not affect treatments

Science is slower than conspiracy theories. Two research presented at the Congress of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology held in Milan and led by the Valencian Institute of Infertility (IVI), the largest assisted reproduction group in the world, confirmed that Covid-19 vaccine it does not affect the success rates of reproductive treatments, which contradicts certain theories defended by the conspiracy movement. Both IVI surveys are being reviewed by external reviewers for publication in scientific journals such as Fertility and sterility.


IVI: the assisted reproduction center which started 30 years ago in a small place in Valencia and is a world leader after delivering 250,000 babies

IVI: the assisted reproduction center which started 30 years ago in a small place in Valencia and is a world leader after delivering 250,000 babies

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The IVI findings add to the Boston University School of Public Health study, published in the scientific journal American Journal of Epidemiologyindicating that the COVID-19 vaccine does not harm the fertility of either member of the couple.

The first study analyzed nearly 5,000 cases and confirms that there is no negative influence of the type of vaccine administered, nor the number of doses, nor the time elapsed between vaccination and reproductive treatment, while the second survey confirms that the type of vaccine received against COVID-19 does not affect the ovarian function of patients undergoing assisted reproduction treatment.

“In the first of our studies, we assessed the rate of implantation sustained over time, i.e. progressive pregnancies, in a group of patients who underwent PGT-A (preimplantation genetic diagnosis) for s ‘ensure that the quality of the embryo that it was adequate and homogeneous throughout the population studied,’ explains Dr. Antonio Requena, General Medical Director of the IVI.

“The analysis of this information confirms that there is no negative influence of the type of vaccine administered, nor of the number of doses, nor of the time elapsed between vaccination and the treatment of reproduction, which is a information that can reassure anyone with concerns or doubts about these types of circumstances,” he adds.

The retrospective study, with a sample of nearly 5,000 cases, analyzes the possible influence of the COVID-19 vaccine on implantation rates after transfer of single —chromosomally normal— euploid embryos. The main focus of this study is the type of vaccine the patient received, as well as the number of doses and the time between the administration of the vaccine and the time when the reproductive treatment was carried out.

“Given the novelty of this disease, there is a lack of information about the effects it may have on reproductive health in society, so studies like this illuminate these concerns about the possibility that either infection or vaccination may have some negative influence on endometrial receptivity.However, and although further evaluation of this area of ​​study is needed, what is clear is that is that targeting motherhood is not a reason to delay vaccination against COVID-19,” Requena points out.

The second survey confirms that the type of vaccine received against COVID-19 does not affect the ovarian function of patients undergoing assisted reproduction treatment.

“Since the declaration of the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting intensive search for vaccines to achieve herd immunity, multiple news sources have pointed to a relationship between vaccination and infertility. At this point, the objective of this work was to evaluate and confirm that there is no negative impact of the different types of vaccines on female fertility”, explains the general medical director of IVI.

The retrospective study was carried out between January and October 2021 on 510 women vaccinated against SARSCoV-2 who underwent assisted reproduction treatment with their own eggs in one of the IVI clinics across Spain.

“As in previous work, more data and an increase in sample size are needed to confirm these findings in the general population, but this research represents an interesting and hopeful starting point, further being , the first study that assesses whether the type of vaccine given against SARS-CoV-2 affects ovarian function in reproductive treatments,” concludes Requena.

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